Now Playing Tracks

ancientart:

An extremely old stamp.

This ancient stamp dates to the 22nd century BC, and is from the holy city of Nippur, located southeastern Iraq. Nippur was the religious centre of Mesopotamia for thousands of years, and was believed to have been where Enlil created mankind.

Translated, the inscription on the stamp reads: Narâm-Sîn built the house/temple of the god Enlil. As the British Museum state: “Such stamps were used to impress or mark the bricks of important religious and public buildings. They are therefore an important source for the identification of architecture and a valuable criterion for the date of a building.” The impression in front of the stamp is modern.

Artefact courtesy of & currently located at The British Museum, London. Photo taken by Klaus Wagensonner.

I only know 1 cuneiform symbol and it’s the little starburst thingy that’s used to denote the name of a deity. Woo!

ancientart:

The focus of today shall be: the Mouse Tank Petroglyphs of the Valley of Fire State Park, Nevada, USA.

Mouse Tank falls within a region which was occupied by Puebloan farmers from about AD 1 to 1200, and contains many Puebloan-style petroglyphs, as attested to by the photographs shown above. At about 1200 Southwestern farming cultures experienced significant drought, which ultimately resulted in the abandonment of the site.

Interpreting Puebloan rock art, to date, remains problematic. However, a few lines of thought can be given to aid us in our understanding. Here I will be summarizing a few key points from the work of Dr. David S. Whitley, who is generally regarded as one of the world’s leading experts on rock art.

Whitley suggests that some aspects of the rock art are likely shamanistic in intend and origin -elements of shamanism have continued through to Puebloan religions today. “Furthermore, we know that one of the characteristics of these archaic shamanistic practices was the making of rock art.” It is also thought that much of the art references the neuropsychological model of motif forms, which derived from altered states of consciousness. Whitley notes that much of the petroglyphs at Mouse Tank display entoptic patterns which are “common percepts in the first stage of a trance.” This includes spirals, parallel lines, zigzags, and other more complicated geometric forms. In essenceWhitley concludes that the Mouse Tank petroglyphs reflect “an expression of what are presumably formal religious cults and rites such as those still practiced by Pueblo groups today.” The figurative images, such as displayed in the 5th photo, likely represent ritual participants, deities, and the like.

Photos taken by & courtesy of George Lamson. Recommended reading: essentially anything from David S. Whitley, in particular: Discovering North American Rock Art (University of Arizona Press 2006) & Introduction to Rock Art Research (Left Coast Press 2011).

ancientart:

Graffiti at Deir el-Bahri.

Deir el-Bahri is the mortuary temple of Egyptian pharaoh Hatshepsut, who ruled from about 1473–1458 BC. 

The shown graffiti was carved later, and depicts Coptic text and symbols, including what appears to be two early Coptic crosses with olive branches. The ‘Copts’ are the Christians of Egypt. According to legend, their church was founded in the 1st century AD in Alexandria by Mark the Evangelist while Egypt was under Roman rule.

Photos taken by Irene Soto, and courtesy of the Institute for the Study of the Ancient World.

plinythesassier:

lionofchaeronea:

A fresco celebrating the fertility of Mt. Vesuvius’ volcanic soil.  To the left stands Dionysus/Bacchus, covered in grape clusters.  In the center is a snake, perhaps representing Ἀγαθὸς Δαίμων (“good spirit”), the tutelary deity or genius loci of the vineyards.  Vesuvius itself looms in the background.  From the “Casa del Centenario” at Pompeii; now in the National Archaeological Museum, Naples.

dat grape suit tho

medievalpoc:

fandomsandfeminism:

superhappy:

cognitivedissonance:

After threats against her life, Anita Sarkeesian canceled an upcoming talk at Utah State University. Gamergate trolls are celebrating on Twitter while simultaneously dismissing the threats as nothing. Does this read like nothing to you?

“I will write my manifesto in her spilled blood, and you will all bear witness to what feminist lies and poison have done to the men of America.”

The email’s author threatened to murder feminist women indiscriminately in a mass shooting. And because carrying guns on campus outweigh the right of students and guests to be safe, Anita Sarkeesian canceled her talk.

BUT WE SHOULDN’T FEEL THREATENED, RIGHT?

BECAUSE IT’S JUST THE INTERNET, RIGHT?

The bullies won this time. And if you think this shit isn’t dangerous, I’m fresh out of fucks to give and I’m not restocking any time soon. It’s goddamn wrong to to dismiss this by claiming the author isn’t serious. Elliot Rodger’s rantings were dismissed until it was too late.

This. Is. Not. OK.

This is terrifying

I’ve been talking a lot about engaging in popular culture with awareness and consuming media critically the last day or two. And I wanted to reblog this because in the United States, the term “culture wars” is often used as a metaphor, but it’s becoming all too accurate.

Writers and bloggers, academics and activists, are not only being openly attacked, but their attackers are being portrayed in the media as having “a difference of opinion”. The fact is, no one is willing to step up and defend our right to speak and be still remain physically safe. Social media and topical websites (by which I mean the people who run them and write for them) are complicit in this kind of silencing and abuse. The police are complicit when they refuse to provide safety. Anyone who does not push back, who does not say, “Wait, this is NOT okay!” is complicit.

Every woman I know who engages in any kind of critique of poplar culture has been subjected to threats, harassment, stalking, and attempts to slander or discredit their work. I’ve been subjected to this, especially when I’ve said anything whatsoever about video games. Where does it end? When do we say “no more”?

We make Tumblr themes