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huntingtonlibrary:

manpodcast:

The second segment of this week’s Modern Art Notes Podcast features Huntington Library curator Jenny Watts. Along with Scott Wilcox, Watts has organized "Bruce Davidson, Paul Caponigro: Two American Photographers in Britain and Ireland." The exhibition examines how trips to the U.K. were important to the careers of two of the most important American photographers of the post-war era. The show is at the Yale Center for British Art in New Haven, Connecticut through September 14. The catalogue was published by Yale University Press.

The Caponigro here, Callanish Stone Circle, Isle of Lewis, Outer Hebrides, Scotland (1972), is one of the photographs Watts and MAN Podcast host Tyler Green discuss on this week’s show. 

How to listen to this week’s show: Listen to or download this week’s program above, on SoundCloudvia direct-link mp3, or subscribe to The MAN Podcast (for free) at:

Go listen!  And then come to the exhibition when it opens here in November!

erikkwakkel:

Funny rabbits

I just encountered this clever and amusing image in a French database of medieval manuscripts. It shows three rabbits running in circles - with shared ears. There is nothing much to this drawing from a book-historical point of view, except to say that it has an Escher-feel to it. In fact, I am not even sure what it means to convey. I am simply sharing it here because the ear entanglement is so cleverly done - and the whole scene brought a big smile to my face.

Pic: Arras, Bibliothèque municipale, MS 7 (13th century).

Note: Various followers on Tumblr and Twitter pointed out parallels of these three hares, both in western and eastern art. This Wikepedia offers more information (link provided by this and this follower).

ancientart:

“Her gods and men call Aphrodite, and Aphrogeneia (the foam-born) because she grew amid the foam.” -Hesiod, Theogony 176.
A few depictions of Aphrodite, the Greek goddess of love and beauty, in ancient Greek pottery.
Aphrodite and Adonis (detail). Attic red-figure squat lekythos, Aison, ca. 410 BC. Courtesy of the Louvre, MNB 2109. Photo by Marie-Lan Nguyen.
Aphrodite on a swan (detail). Tondo from an Attic white-ground red-figured kylix. From tomb F43 in Kameiros (Rhodes). Pistoxenos Painter, circa 460 BC. Courtesy of the British Museum, GR 1869.10-7.77. Photo by Marie-Lan Nguyen.
Vessel with Leda and the Swan (detail). Attributed to the Painter of Louvre MNB 1148, Greek, Apulia, South Italy, about 330 B.C. Courtesy of the Getty Villa, 86.AE.680. Photo by Dave & Margie Hill.
Zoom Info
ancientart:

“Her gods and men call Aphrodite, and Aphrogeneia (the foam-born) because she grew amid the foam.” -Hesiod, Theogony 176.
A few depictions of Aphrodite, the Greek goddess of love and beauty, in ancient Greek pottery.
Aphrodite and Adonis (detail). Attic red-figure squat lekythos, Aison, ca. 410 BC. Courtesy of the Louvre, MNB 2109. Photo by Marie-Lan Nguyen.
Aphrodite on a swan (detail). Tondo from an Attic white-ground red-figured kylix. From tomb F43 in Kameiros (Rhodes). Pistoxenos Painter, circa 460 BC. Courtesy of the British Museum, GR 1869.10-7.77. Photo by Marie-Lan Nguyen.
Vessel with Leda and the Swan (detail). Attributed to the Painter of Louvre MNB 1148, Greek, Apulia, South Italy, about 330 B.C. Courtesy of the Getty Villa, 86.AE.680. Photo by Dave & Margie Hill.
Zoom Info

ancientart:

Her gods and men call Aphrodite, and Aphrogeneia (the foam-born) because she grew amid the foam.” -Hesiod, Theogony 176.

A few depictions of Aphrodite, the Greek goddess of love and beauty, in ancient Greek pottery.

Aphrodite and Adonis (detail). Attic red-figure squat lekythos, Aison, ca. 410 BC. Courtesy of the Louvre, MNB 2109. Photo by Marie-Lan Nguyen.

Aphrodite on a swan (detail). Tondo from an Attic white-ground red-figured kylix. From tomb F43 in Kameiros (Rhodes). Pistoxenos Painter, circa 460 BC. Courtesy of the British MuseumGR 1869.10-7.77. Photo by Marie-Lan Nguyen.

Vessel with Leda and the Swan (detail). Attributed to the Painter of Louvre MNB 1148, Greek, Apulia, South Italy, about 330 B.C. Courtesy of the Getty Villa, 86.AE.680. Photo by Dave & Margie Hill.

richard-miles-archaeologist:

Ancient Worlds - BBC Two
Episode 1 “Come Together”

Uruk - “the mother of all cities”.

Uruk was one of the most important cities in ancient Mesopotamia; an ancient city of Sumer -and later Babylonia, situated east of the present bed of the Euphrates river.  According to the Sumerian King List, it was founded by King Enmerkar sometime around 4500 BCE.

Uruk is considered the first true city in the world. It was home to 40.000 or perhaps 50.000 people, a population density unprecedented in human history.

In myth and literature, Uruk was famous as the capital city of Gilgamesh. The great epic poem The Legend of Gilgamesh contains a proud description of his city:

Go up, pace out the walls of Uruk.
Study the foundation terrace and examine the brickwork.
Is not its masonry of kiln - fired brick?
And did not seven masters lay its foundations?
One square mile of city, one square mile of gardens,
One square mile of clay pits, a half square mile of Ishtar’s dwelling,
Three and a half square miles is the measure of Uruk

PART I

Uruk, Iraq

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